Twitch To Add Tags For Hot Tub Streams, As It Says It Will Not Stop Them

Twitch
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In the past few weeks, Twitch has been the talk of many gamers. The site allows people to stream under a magnitude of categories. Many of these are gaming-focused, however, one of the most popular categories is Just Chatting. In this category, streamers will sit and chat with their viewers, rather than playing a game or hosting a podcast.

However, this category has caused some controversy. Streamers have taken to streaming from a hot tub, with the focus being mainly on the female streamers doing so. The conversation revolves around their attire, and it being what many deemed as “sexually suggestive”. The loophole of this is that, given the hot tub, streamers are allowed to wear appropriate attire. Many choose to wear bikinis, which led to many saying that they were using sex to gain subs (and thus money).

Amouranth is one of the streamers associated with hot tub streams

Twitch recently came out and addressed this publicly. After having taken some time to respond, they released a statement on May 21st. In it, they begin by saying that nobody deserves to be harassed for the content they choose to stream. They then go on to explain that “being found to be sexy by others is not against our rules, and Twitch will not take enforcement action against women, or anyone on our service, for their perceived attractiveness.”

“first and foremost, no one deserves to be harassed for the content they choose to stream, how they look, or who they are, and we will take action against anyone who perpetuates this kind of toxicity on our service. Second, while we have guidelines about sexually suggestive content, being found to be sexy by others is not against our rules, and Twitch will not take enforcement action against women, or anyone on our service, for their perceived attractiveness.” 

The statement goes on to explain that body paint, and swimwear attire is permitted under Twitch policies. Many had worried that this content would lead to an adpocalypse on Twitch, similar to that we saw on Youtube. The idea being that brands choose to have adverts in the Just Chatting section, not knowing these hot tub streams are in this category. This could leads to advertisers pulling adverts from Twitch, and a loss in revenue to its creators.

But Twitch has clarified they have a solution to this; albeit a short-term fix. Twitch has created a “Pools, Hot Tubs, and Beaches” category for these streams. This would allow advertisers to choose not to advertise on these streams if they wish. This added control should prevent an adpocalypse, but it remains unclear what Twitch deems to be a long-term fix.

What do you think about this? Is a category for these streams enough? Or do you feel Twitch need to do more? Let us know in the comments below!

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About the author

I've loved video games for as long as I can remember. Recently found a love for reporting video game news and decided to start Games Bulletin, and have been enjoying every step of the journey.

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